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Re: A14 exhaust: where would you put an oxygen sensor? Also wow the back nut is a bear
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Yeah, I'm looking at just below the joint. (But low enough I can get the clamping collar for the joint down past the screws, obviously.)

I'll look for a copper seal/gasket: I hadn't yet found one available.

Zigmondo: there is room above the gasket but I have a cast iron header. (Haven't yet made my own.) That'd be a perfect place to put it but I can't weld cast iron. I've brazed steel to cast iron before but this definitely needs to be airtight, and I'm not confident of my ability to manage that.

Thanks!

Posted on: 2021/1/17 18:13
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A14 exhaust: where would you put an oxygen sensor? Also wow the back nut is a bear
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I have a non-stock exhaust, that drops straight down and then goes under the transmission to head backwards on the right-hand side.
Getting to the inside of the three nuts that hold that to the exhaust header is incredibly annoying.
This is mostly a complaint. I designed the exhaust poorly. But, wow, think about bolt access when you build new stuff. I wish I'd stayed with the A12 two-bolt exhaust.

However, the question part: where would you put an oxygen sensor?
I know in the A15E it was formed into the cast iron header itself.
I don't have one of those, and unless I braze, it's hard to get a port welded into cast iron.
So I'd like to put it right below the header, in the steel exhaust pipe.
Here's the problem: with the A14 (and all the non-fuel-injected cars)the joint between the exhaust and the header is a steel on steel joint, and it may leak. If it's leaking, the sensor isn't going to be accurate.
It looks like on the fuel injected models they used two flat plates with a sealing gasket.
What would you do?
I suppose I could machine a thin foil-ish copper gasket that I stuck on the joint and compressed with the three bolts to get a compliant seal.
My exhaust pipe hangs low and regularly hits the ground, so I'm doubtful that would last very long.

This might be more difficult than I thought it was going to be...

Posted on: 2021/1/17 3:55
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Re: Declinig content ???
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The other thing I notice is that when I first started poking around here 9 years ago, I could search ebay (US) for A-series parts and find 10 engines and twenty pages of parts, and now there's like one engine and nothing but aftermarket carbs, gasket kits, a few distributors and water pumps.
That's really depressing.

But I have a line on an A15 and an FS5W60 in a junkyard, so I'm pretty stoked. I hope they're fixable.

Posted on: 2020/11/4 3:14
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Re: EFI overall design: how does a slosh tank fill without overflowing?
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That helps a bunch: thanks! And yeah I was thinking the top of the slosh tank would have a vent and be pumped down probably by manifold vacuum to capture any gas fumes. (I know you have to rigorously account for all the air going into the system to keep the AFR balanced.)

Posted on: 2020/10/17 6:25
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EFI overall design: how does a slosh tank fill without overflowing?
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I'm trying to figure out whether it makes sense convert to fuel injection, probably via something like the cheap EFI thread.
The modifications to the intake system all make sense.
What I'm wondering: I'd like to use a slosh tank in the engine compartment that the regulator dumps into, so the electric fuel pump pulls from that, the fuel goes to the injector, excess fuel returns into the slosh tank, and then I can build it with baffles and stuff so I don't have to mess with the main fuel tank, and just draw calm, non-bubble-filled fuel from it to refill the slosh tank.
So how do I set that up? What I was thinking of was using the existing mechanical fuel pump to fill the slosh tank, and then I don't have to run a return line back to the main tank. (This isn't in a Datsun and the car it's in has difficult access to modifying the fuel tank, so it's really hard to put a baffle in, for instance.)
But if the mechanical fuel pump is running uncontrolled it'll overfill the slosh tank. I need something like the float valve/needle to restrict it.
Is there a way to set this up so there's no return to the main tank?
I can think of some ways to do this involving ECU control of the electric fuel pump, so it only pushes in as much fuel as the injector needs and there's no return at all, but that's a big chunk of software and tuning that I don't really want to get into.
I could use the slosh tank as a baffling system to reduce most of the bubbles from the high pressure fuel spraying into it, and then run an unpumped drain line from the bottom of that tank to just dump into the main tank, hoping it won't be sufficiently turbulent to get bubbles in the line going forwards.
(I know the recommendation is "just don't ever go below 1/4 a tank" but I'm not the only driver of this car and am dubious that rule would get followed.)

Any thoughts on how y'all would design this?

Posted on: 2020/10/16 15:26
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Re: Declinig content ???
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Yeah: the tech wiki covers almost everything now, and this site is harder to use via phones so we're not getting new users who only use phones, and you need to have money to get into the old datsun game now.
I use the tech wiki on a nearly daily basis. It's an amazing resource, compared to just about any other engine out there.

I would LOVE a 1750cc engine. That's really cool, but I bet it was a ton of work.

Posted on: 2020/10/16 3:39
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(not my) Datsun B210 for sale for $400 in colorado springs colorado
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https://cosprings.craigslist.org/cto/d ... -210-with/7139683774.html

It looks like the mechanicals may be usable and claims to be manual. The transmission alone is worth the ask. If nobody else gets it I may just for the trans.

Posted on: 2020/6/13 6:11
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Re: for those considering an EV datto, best electric engine yet!
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Kinda want four of the 15kW units, one going to each wheel. I like AWD and one with automatic wheel-by-wheel traction control and turn assistance would be really cool, especially in a lightweight car.

Posted on: 2020/1/28 4:39
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Re: casting 3D printed intake manifolds
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I am totally not kidding about the safety/protective equipment. When I was young and dumb I did a pour on concrete. Some of the aluminum overflowed and when it hit the concrete, even though it had been poured 20 years earlier and we hadn't had rain in months, the concrete exploded like a landmine and I got to watch a drip of molten aluminum run down my face shield briefly before it froze. Ever since then I pour over dirt or sand.

One nice thing about 3d prints is you can break them into pieces if you need something bigger than your printer. Just print it in eight chunks that snap together and use wax to smooth the seams. Similarly you can print complex cored molds. I keep thinking about casting an OHV crossflow A-series head. Print the lower section including the chambers, place a pre-formed core for all the oil passages into it, and snap on the top section that has the lower bearing halves for the rocker. It's like green sand casting without the need for draft angles on everything, and no need for split molds. You can even print core boxes for making the cores, albeit you can't bake a printed core box so that'd have to be sodium silicate and CO2 cured.

Posted on: 2019/11/11 2:24
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Re: My A12 round port turbo manifold
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That render looks amazing, but all the rest of the pictures I get "image you are requesting does not exist" from imgur, and I'd love to see how it came out.

Posted on: 2019/11/9 3:42
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